John Gralenski: Comments were not taken lightly

To the editor:

As usual, seems like everything has a dark side. I was so pleased with myself when my grand daughter taught me how to make a comment on Facebook. There I was, scanning down the posts when I came across some pictures of a large protest march in Seattle. They were protesting Pres. Trump, and while they were at it, threw in some feminism, too. My niece and her family live there. I know her and her husband are flag-waving liberals. There were comments under the pictures like, "Today, I am proud of my city."
I don't think very highly of protests. They seem to bring out the mob mentality and, at best, don't seem to accomplish much, but they sure are popular these days. Protests have replaced baseball as the great American pass-time.
Then, after a series of mob pictures, there was one of a single woman waving a placard with the slogan you've seen, about how a woman should be able to do whatever she wants with her body. This is a pro-abortion slogan, and it turns out is also a trap. With my newly learned ability to comment, and my general tendency to be a smart Alec. I wrote a comment, "Is she saying that prostitution should be legal?"
Oh boy. It turns out that the woman was a close friend of my niece, and that she had posted the picture. Next morning my computer was smoking. "How dare you insult someone you don't even know?!" (Heck, those are the easiest kind, I thought to myself.) I didn't think I'd insulted anyone. I just asked how far you wanted to go with this slogan. Still, if I had known it was niece's friend (grand daughter hasn't showed my how to tell who posted the picture.), I wouldn't have said anything.. But it was too late, the trap had been sprung.
So, with the help of modern technology, I can put my foot in my mouth from coast to coast. Sigh — 

John Gralenski

Shelburne